Wall Street Journal U.S. Cellphone Study Fans Cancer Worries

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Researchers found incidences of tumor in rats exposed to low-level radio waves, reigniting debate over safety


Video: Wall Street Journalist Ryan Knutson discusses with Tanya Rivero.

Devra Davis, founder of advocacy group Environmental Health Trust, disagreed. “If we treat this as we did the early studies on passive smoking, asbestos, or hormone replacement therapy and wait for more proof of human harm before taking steps to reduce exposures our grandchildren will pay the price,” Dr. Davis said. “The absence of an epidemic of brain cancer at this time is not proof of the safety of cellphones.”

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U.S. Cellphone Study Fans Cancer Worries

Researchers found incidences of tumor in rats exposed to low-level radio waves, reigniting debate over safety

May 28, 2016 11:51 a.m. ET by RYAN KNUTSON

For almost as long as people have had cellphones, scientists have been debating whether the now-ubiquitous devices cause health effects.

More than a decade ago, the U.S. government set in motion a study to help answer the question. Its initial findings were released this week. The researchers said the findings were significant enough that they felt the urgency to release the results before the entire study was complete.

The study found “low incidences” of two types of tumors—one in the brain and one in the heart—in male rats that were exposed to the kinds of low-level radio waves that are emitted by cellphones.

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