Reports on Power Consumption and Increasing Energy Use of Wireless Systems and Digital Ecosystem

Share

Reports on the Increasing Energy Use of Wireless Systems and Digital Ecosystem

The more we use wireless electronic devices, the more energy we will consume. Industry reports document that energy efficiency gains have not been met and that energy use will increase as the IOT explodes over the next decade. The phenomenal growth in internet traffic has  important implications for energy demand.

“Alarming new research suggests that failure to source renewable energy could make data centres one of the biggest polluters in just seven years. As analysts estimate as many as 50 billion devices to be connected by 2020, with some statistics pointing to more than 100 billion a further five years down the line, new alarming research suggests that data centres will be one of the biggest energy consumers on the planet, beating many countries’ energy consumption levels.”

– João Marques Lima in Data Centres Of The World Will Consume 1/5 Of Earth’s Power By 2025

 

EHT has listed reports on the ever increasing use of energy for the every increasing wireless rollout. We also recommend reading Green Americas article “Smarter, Safer Energy Savers” featuring an interview with Devra Davis PhD.

Energy Consumption in Wired and Wireless Access Networks by Jayant Baliga, University of Melbourne and National ICT Australia Robert Ayre, Kerry Hinton, and Rodney S. Tucker, University of Melbourne IEEE Communications Magazine • June 2011

  • Abstract: Energy consumption is becoming an increasingly important issue throughout the community. For network operators in particular it is a concern as networks expand to deliver increasing traffic levels to increasing numbers of customers. The majority of the energy used by the Internet today is consumed in the access network, and this will continue to be the case for the short-tomid-term future. Access technologies should thus be a prime focus for energy use mitigation. In this article, we present a detailed analysis of energy consumption in current and future access networks. We present the energy consumption of DSL, HFC networks, passive optical networks, fiber to the node, point-to-point optical systems, UMTS (W-CDMA), and WiMAX. Optical access networks are the most energy efficient of the available access technologies.
  • In ADSL, HFC, PON, and FTTN the customer modem or ONU consumes over 65 percent of the total power in the access network. These units would normally operate continuously, but the power consumption of the access network could be significantly reduced through the use of automated sleep modes in customer premises network equipment [9].

Digitalisation, energy and data demand: The impact of Internet traffic on overall and peak electricity consumption” Energy Research and Social Science, 

  • “We argue that policies and interventions in this area should aim to do more than improve the energy efficiencyof digital infrastructures: they can also focus on the growing demand for data.”
  • “Most estimates of ICT-related energy consumption also predict steady growth. For instance, Van Heddeghem et al. [29] estimate that the electricity consumed by digital devices and infrastructures is growing faster (at 7% per year) than global electricity demand itself (at 3% per year), with the rate of growth of networks highest of all (at 10.4%). Andrae and Edler [30], also anticipating a compound rate of growth of 7% per year, calculate that the production and operation of ICT will rise to 21% of global electricity consumption by 2030: this is an absolute rise to 8000 TWh, from a base of around 2000 TWh in 2010. In a worst case scenario, this could reach as high as 50% of global electricity use by 2030, but only 8% in the best case. The IEA [2], who estimate that networks consume slightly less (at 185 TWh in 2015) than data centres (at 194 TWh in 2014), foresee only moderate growth in the energy consumption of data centres of 3% by 2020. But they estimate greater uncertainty for networks, with scenarios varying between growth of 70% or a decline of 15% by 2021 depending on trends in energy efficiency.”
  • “These trends in data growth represent grounds for ongoing caution, and concern, as to the overall trajectories of Internet-related electricity use. Firstly, mobile networks are more electricity intensive than fixed-line access networks [39] yet mobile data traffic is growing faster. Secondly, video traffic is associated with the growth in fixed and mobile network traffic, yet watching video across mobile networks is especially energy-intensive [33]. Thirdly, data traffic in the ‘busy hour’ is growing at a much higher rate than average; leading to increased consumption at particular times of dayas well as the expansion of networks (and associated overhead consumption) since “service providers plan network capacityaccording to peak rates rather than average rates” ([38]: 26).”

In “Total Consumer Power Consumption Forecast Report”  (Andree 2017 Huawei)  the reality that the communications industry could use 20% of all electricity and emit up to 5.5% of the world’s carbon emissions by 2025 is documented. The report looks at the expected every increasing energy consumption of the Internet of Things with consideration of not only powering the devices, but also  to the manufacture and  to the infrastructure of the devices (data centres, wireless base stations, distribution networks).  The Report states that although there are energy efficient gains,   future consumer communications  infrastructure cannot slow its overall electricity use until  2025. “The electric power consumption of the present ICT scope will be very significant unless great efforts are put into power saving features.” PPT presentation 

Emerging Trends in Electricity Consumption for Consumer ICT, by Peter Corcoran and Anders Andrae of Huawei.

  • “Two things are clear – firstly most LTE/G4 networks will operate at much less than capacity and thus at poor overall efficiency; secondly, the local network topology, traffic balancing between different cell sizes and operational policies will determine the practical efficiencies of these networks rather than the digital simulations that are used for most of today’s estimations.”
  • “Expert projections indicate that the number of networked appliances could reach 50-100 billion over the next 5 to 10 years.”
  • “Baseline estimates for the main categories of consumption – direct, manufacturing related, network-related and data-center related – are determined for 2012. A number of methodological approaches are outlined to extrapolate trends over the period 2013-2017 and projections based on best-case, expected and worst-case scenarios are provided.”
  • ” Our best-case analysis shows a decline in consumption from 7.4% in 2012 to 6.9% of total global electricity consumption in 2017; however the worst-case shows a rise to 12.0% driven primarily by expansion of the network and data-center infrastructure.”
  • “And while our hopes lie with an overall decline in electricity consumption on the lines of our best-case scenario, the alternative worstcase scenario shows annual compound growth rates in electricity usage of more than 12% for the next 5 years. This can serve as a motivation for all of us in different industry sectors to continue to focus research efforts to improve efficiency and reduce the impact of new technologies across the sector.”

 

“The Cloud Begins with Coal – Big Data, Big Networks, Big Infrastructure, and Big Power. An overview of the electricity used by the global digital ecosystem.” Mark P. Mills, National Mining Association / American Coalition for Clean Coal Electricity, 2013

  • Demand for technology is outstripping the increase in efficiency of power use in the  Information-Communications-Technologies (ICT) ecosystem. Power consumption will increase because electricity is needed to supply:
    • Data centers and warehouses
    • Broadband wireless networks
    • End-use devices like pcs and tablets
    • Manufacturing facilities producing IT hardware.
  • The  Information-Communications-Technologies (ICT) ecosystem consumes almost 10% of world electricity generation and 50% more energy than global aviation.
  • “Although charging up a single tablet or smart phone requires a negligible amount of electricity, using either to watch an hour of video weekly consumes annually more electricity in the remote networks than two new refrigerators use in a year.”
  • “Even with substantial gains in efficiency overall global energy use will rise by an amount equivalent to adding to United States worth demand by 2030.”

Lotfi Belkhir, Ahmed Elmeligi, Assessing ICT global emissions footprint: Trends to 2040 & recommendations, Journal of Cleaner Production,
Volume 177, 2018, Pages 448-463, ISSN 0959-6526,

  • In light of the concerted efforts to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE) per the so-called Paris Agreement, the Information and Communication Industry (ICT) has received little attention as a significant contributor to GHGE and if anything is often highly praised for enabling efficiencies that help reduce other industry sectors footprint. In this paper, we aim at assessing the global carbon footprint of the overall ICT industry, including the contribution from the main consumer devices, the data centers and communication networks, and compare it with the to the total worldwide GHGE. We conduct a detailed and rigorous analysis of the ICT global carbon footprint, including both the production and the operational energy of ICT devices, as well as the operational energy for the supporting ICT infrastructure. We then compare this contribution to the global 2016-level GHGE.

    We have found that, if unchecked, ICT GHGE relative contribution could grow from roughly 1–1.6% in 2007 to exceed 14% of the 2016-level worldwide GHGE by 2040, accounting for more than half of the current relative contribution of the whole transportation sector. Our study also highlights the contribution of smart phones and shows that by 2020, the footprint of smart phones alone would surpass the individual contribution of desktops, laptops and displays. Finally, we offer some actionable recommendations on how to mitigate and curb the ICT explosive GHGE footprint, through a combination of renewable energy use, tax policies, managerial actions and alternative business models.

“The Power of Wireless Cloud”, The Center for Energy Efficient Telecommunications, 2013

  • This study found that wireless networking infrastructure worldwide accounts for significantly more power consumption than data centers.
  • “Our energy calculations show that by 2015, wireless cloud will consume up to 43 TWh, compared to only 9.2 TWh in 2012, an increase of 460%. This is an increase in carbon footprint from 6 megatonnes of CO2 in 2012 to up to 30 megatonnes of CO2 in 2015, the equivalent of adding 4.9 million cars to the roads. Up to 90% of this consumption is attributable to wireless access network technologies, data centres account for only 9%.”
  • The wireless cloud consumes far more energy to keep streaming or downloading and uploading files wirelessly than it does to carry the same files around and access them from the local device.

 

United States Data Center Energy Usage Report”  Berkeley Laboratory, 2016

  • Based on current trend estimates, U.S. data centers are projected to consume approximately 73 billion kWh in 2020.

 

“Constantly Connected: B.C.’s obsession with personal electronics and how it’s shifting household electricity use” BC Hydro, 2018

  • While electronic devices do not consume a huge amount of electricity individually, taken together, electricity used by electronics has increased by nearly 150%—from 7% to 17%—since the early 1990s.
  • The proportion of electricity use attributed to small appliances and electronics has steadily increased year-after-year as more electronics and small appliances are added to the home

 

Data Center Efficiency Assessment” National Resources Defense Council, 2014

  • In 2013, U.S. data centers consumed an estimated 91 billion kilowatt-hours of electricity, the equivalent annual output of 34 large (500-megawatt) coal-fired power plants, enough electricity to power all the households in New York City twice over.
  • Data center electricity consumption is projected to increase to roughly 140 billion kilowatt-hours annually by 2020, the equivalent annual output of 50 power plants, costing American businesses $13 billion per year in electricity bills and causing the emission of nearly 150 million metric tons of carbon pollution annually.

 

The energy and greenhouse-gas implications of internet video streaming in the United States” Arman Shehabi, Ben Walker, and Eric Masanet, Environmental Research Letters 2014

  • Data transmission is the most energy-intensive part of streaming movies.
  • The authors state that results from this study indicate that designers and policy makers should focus on the efficiency of end-user devices and network transmission energy to curb future increases in energy use from the proliferation of video streaming.

Published Research that Indicates Energy Efficiency Needs to Be Addressed 

Energy Efficiency Challenges of 5G Small Cell Networks. byGe, Xiaohu & Yang, Jing & Gharavi, Hamid & Sun, Yang. (2017) in IEEE Communications

  • “The deployment of a large number of small cells poses new challenges to energy efficiency, which has often been ignored in fifth generation (5G) cellular networks. While massive multiple-input multiple outputs (MIMO) will reduce the transmission power at the expense of higher computational cost, the question remains as to which computation or transmission power is more important in the energy efficiency of 5G small cell networks. Thus, the main objective in this paper is to investigate the computation power based on the Landauer principle. Simulation results reveal that more than 50% of the energy is consumed by the computation power at 5G small cell BS’s. Moreover, the computation power of 5G small cell BS can approach 800 watt when the massive MIMO (e.g., 128 antennas) is deployed to transmit high volume traffic. This clearly indicates that computation power optimization can play a major role in the energy efficiency of small cell networks.”

 

Energy Efficiency Analysis of Small Cell Networks by  Chang Li, Jun Zhang, and K. B. Letaief, Fellow, IEEE Dept. of ECE, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

  • “Compared with a macro BS, the power consumption for a micro, pico- or femto-BS is much lower. However, due to the high BS density in small cell networks, it is not clear whether it will be more energy efficient than the conventional network structure.”
  • This paper analyzes network energy efficiency in a small cell network and concludes that “in most cases we will need to make a tradeoff between the network throughput and energy efficiency” and proposes solutions for network design.

Industry Reports or Companies Courting the Industry 

Powering the future of small cells and beyond by CommScope

  • “The advanced capabilities of today’s 5G-ready small cells mean added power requirements. Increased data traffic requires more computational power. Although massive MIMO can help improve spectral efficiency, power efficiency is generally lower and a typical three-sector small cell can require 200–1,000 watts of power.”

SIGN UP TO STAY INFORMED

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and science from Environmental Health Trust. We email our subscribers with a newsletter just once a month and never share your email with anyone.


Thank you for signing up for our newsletter!