Review Paper Finds Evidence that EMF Contributes to Infertility: Proteomic impacts of electromagnetic fields on the male reproductive system

Proteomic impacts of electromagnetic fields on the male reproductive system

By Masood Sepehrimanesh PhD and Devra Lee Davis PhD MPH
Comparative Clinical Pathology

Masood Sepehrimanesh and Devra Lee Davis have published a review paper on the proteomic experimental and clinical evidence that EMF acts as a male-mediated teratogen and contributor to infertility.

Abstract: The use of mobile phones and other wireless transmitting devices is increasing dramatically in developing and developed countries, as is the rate of infertility. A number of respected infertility clinics in Australia, India, USA, and Iran are reporting that those who regularly use mobile phones tend to have reduced sperm quantity and quality. Some experimental studies have found that human sperm exposed to electromagnetic fields (EMF), either simulated or from mobile phones, developed biomarkers of impaired structure and function, as well as reduced quantity. These encompass pathological, endocrine, and proteomic changes. Proteins perform a vast array of functions within living organisms, and the proteome is the entire array of proteins—the ultimate biomolecules in the pathways of DNA transcription to translation. Proteomics is the art and science of studying all proteins in cells, using different techniques. This paper reviews proteomic experimental and clinical evidence that EMF acts as a male-mediated teratogen and contributor to infertility.

Excerpts from the paper:

“Electromagnetic fields (EMF) induce a range of damaging impacts on the capacity of males to produce healthy offspring, affecting pre- and peri-fertilization, as well as producing tera- togenic results including miscarriage.”
“In this study, we reviewed structural and functional proteomic changes related to EMF exposure. Reported changes are categorized based on main affected tissue and also the most important adverse effects. Overall, these results demonstrate significant effects of radio frequency-modulated EMF exposure on the proteome, including both structural and functional impacts such as a decrease in the diameter and weight of the seminiferous tubules and the mean height of the germinal epithelium (Ozguner et al. 2005) and/or pathological and physiological changes in key biochemical components of the testicular tissues (Luo et al. 2013). These structural and functional changes may account for the pathological impact of EMF on the male reproductive system reported in the experimental work that we and others have conducted. While EMF is currently being used for a number of therapeutic applications (REF), the work we have reviewed here clearly indicates a range of harmful effects, especially on genital systems.”
Read the article online here.

 

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